Kali Linux has been released

Seven years of developing BackTrack Linux has taught us a significant amount about what we, and the security community, think a penetration testing distribution should look like. We’ve taken all of this knowledge and experience and implemented it in our “next generation” penetration testing distribution.

kali-linux-offsec-blog
After a year of silent development, Offensive Security is proud to announce the release and public availability of “Kali Linux“, the most advanced, robust, and stable penetration testing distribution to date.

Kali is a more mature, secure, and enterprise-ready version of BackTrack Linux. Trying to list all the new features and possibilities that are now available in Kali would be an impossible task on this single page. We therefore invite you to visit our new Kali Linux Website and Kali Linux Documentation site to experience the goodness of Kali for yourself.

Source: http://www.offensive-security.com/kali-distribution/kali-linux-released/

SecurityTube GNU Debugger Expert – Part 1: Course Introduction and Lab Setup

Description: The GNU Debugger or GDB as it is popularly called is one of the most important tools in a binary analysis researcher’s arsenal. Unfortunately, even though the official documentation is HUGE, it’s quite difficult for beginners and even intermediate users to pick things up!

The SecurityTube GNU Debugger Expert course and certification aims to help you get up and running with GDB. In course of these videos we will look at applying GDB on multiple architectures – 32, 64 and ARM. We will look at how to do runtime analysis, program disassembly, reverse engineering and a ton of other fun things!

In the first video, we take you through what the course is about and get started with setting up a lab and with our first customary demo :)

PDF slides and C Code used in this video can be downloaded here: http://www.securitytube.net/sgde?id=1

For your Infosec Certification needs please check our courses out: http://securitytube-training.com/

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SecurityTube GNU Debugger Expert – Part 2: What’s up with the Symbol Files?

Description: We have started the SecurityTube GNU Debugger Expert series. Begin watching Video 1 here:

In this video, we will be looking at what symbol files contain, how to copy, strip and add symbols to binaries and some other interesting things. In course of this video, the following commands will be used:

1. Info – sources, variables, functions, scope function_name, maint print symbols filename

2. Objcopy : –only-keep-debug and –add-gnu-debuglink

3. Strip : –strip-debug and –strip-unneeded

4. Symbol_file

DOWNLOAD PDF SLIDES OF THIS VIDEO AND CODE SNIPPETS: http://www.securitytube.net/sgde?id=2

To have a look at our other courses and certifications: http://securitytube-training.com

We look forward to your comments below! :)

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SecurityTube GNU Debugger Expert – Part 3: Analyzing Symbols with NM

Description: This video is part of the SecurityTube GNU Debugger course and certification! You can start this series by watching Part 1: http://www.securitytube.net/video/5654

In this video, we will look at the NM utility and see how it can extract useful details about symbols in binaries. In course of this video, we will see how to locate symbols in the text section, initialized and uninitialized sections and many others tips and tricks!

DOWNLOAD THE PDF SLIDES AND CODE SNIPPETS OF THIS VIDEO HERE: http://www.securitytube.net/sgde?id=3

Please have a look at all the SecurityTube.net Online Courses here: http://securitytube-training.com/
Student Testimonials say it all :) http://securitytube-training.com/testimonials/

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SecurityTube GNU Debugger Expert – Part 4: System Call Tracing with Strace

Description: This video is part of the SecurityTube GNU Debugger Expert course and certification. You can begin watching this series by starting with Video 1 here: http://www.securitytube.net/video/5654

In this video, we look at a helper utility called Strace which allows us to trace which system calls are called by a program during execution. We will look at different options to output to file, get statistics on the syscalls used by the program and most importantly trace specific syscalls made by the program. This video is a must watch if you are curious about how to look under the hood when a program executes!

PDF AND CODE FILE DOWNLOADS HERE: http://www.securitytube.net/sgde?id=4

Please have a look at the SecurityTube Certifications: http://securitytube-training.com/

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SecurityTube GNU Debugger Expert – Part 5: Breakpoints, Examining Registers and Memory

Description: This video is part of the SecurityTube GNU Debugger course and certification! You can view the first video of this series here: http://www.securitytube.net/video/5654

In this video, we will look at what Breakpoints are – how to create, enable, disable and delete them! Also, we will see how we can monitor register values and memory locations while at a breakpoint. This is an extremely important concept in this course! so please pay special attention :)

PDF AND CODE SNIPPET DOWNLOADS: http://www.securitytube.net/sgde?id=5

SecurityTube Certifications: http://securitytube-training.com/

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SecurityTube GNU Debugger Expert – Part 6: Modifying Registers and Memory

Description: This video is part of the SecurityTube GNU Debugger Expert course and certification. The first video in this series is posted here: http://www.securitytube.net/video/5654

In this video, we will look at a very important concept – modifying data in memory at runtime and changing values in the CPU registers. This exercise is very important for reverse engineers or those into software cracking. We take sample programs and see how we can change even the EIP register to run an absolutely different function! This will be a very enjoyable video! :)

PDF SLIDES AND CODE DOWNLOAD: http://www.securitytube.net/sgde?id=6

SecurityTube Certifications and Student Testimonials: http://securitytube-training.com/?id=cert-link

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SecurityTube GNU Debugger Expert – Part 7: GDB Convenience Variables and Calling Routines

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Description: This video is part of the SecurityTube GNU Debugger Expert course and certification! You can begin this series by starting with Video 1 here: http://www.securitytube.net/video/5654

In this video, we will look at GDB Convenience variables – which you can define with GDB and use it to hold temporary data while analyzing a program. Interestingly, you can also change references even with your program to point to them :) We will also look at calling functions in the program from within GDB – this can be functions in the program code or from linked libraries. This is really one of the most interesting features we cover in this video and forms the basis for in-memory testing and fuzzing.

PDF SLIDES AND CODE SNIPPETS DOWNLOAD: http://www.securitytube.net/sgde?id=7

Like this Video? Checkout SecurityTube Certifications: http://securitytube-training.com/

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SecurityTube GNU Debugger Expert – Part 8: Cracking a Simple Binary with DEBUG Symbols

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Description: This video is part of the SecurityTube GNU Debugger Expert course and certification. Begin with watching Part 1: http://www.securitytube.net/video/5654 if you have not done so already!

In this video, we will take a stab at cracking a program with basic password protection using GDB. As this is a basic example, we will assume that we have the debug symbols included in the binary. In course of this video, we will see how “info functions” “info scope function_name” etc. can come in super handy!

PDF AND CODE DOWNLOAD: http://www.securitytube.net/sgde?id=8

SecurityTube Certifications: http://securitytube-training.com/

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Hack.me – House of the rising Sandbox

Hack.me – House of the rising Sandbox « eLearnSecurity Blog .better-tag-cloud-shortcode li,.better-tag-cloud-shortcode li a,li#better-tag-cloud ul.wp-tag-cloud li,li#better-tag-cloud ul.wp-tag-cloud li a {display:inline;} logo HOMEAUTHORSABOUT eLearnSecurity FREE TRAINING MODULE Discover our training courses here TagscainCompany Newsconferencehack.memetasploitmeterpretermsfencodemsfpayloadNessusnetwork securitynewsnmappenetration testingpenetration testing coursepentestpivotingResearchessponsorshipsystem securityVideoweb application securityArchiveSeptember 2012 (1)June 2012 (1)May 2012 (1)March 2012 (1)September 2011 (1)March 2011 (1)January 2011 (1)December 2010 (3)August 2010 (1)May 2010 (4)April 2010 (2) 9SepHack.me – House of the rising SandboxPosted by Armando on 9 September 2012 – No Comments »

Yesterday we’ve announced our craziest project ever. We’ll release it on October 9th.
(Why crazy? Subscribe to our RSS)

If you still don’t know about it, please check it out here.

Ever since the first time I envisioned a platform where vulnerable web applications could be created and shared much like you do with a Mobile App on the Apple Store, me and Domenico Quaranta (@domequaranta), creator of Coliseum, would relentlessly put down notes and ideas on how this platform should have looked like.

Putting vuln apps in a virtual machine was easy: we could do it in days.

With Rackspace and Amazon, spawning a new virtual machine is just a matter of seconds, however this was not the solution we were looking for.

We just can’t be happy with something good enough. It’s the curse of engineers. We seek for optimum.

We knew we needed a powerful yet reliable way to run code on the fly in a secure manner.

Scalable was also a key word: we wanted to create new case studies (vuln apps) easily and fast in order to provide our students with always new scenarios to play with.

You won’t do that with a virtual machine hosting your code.

It was early 2010 when we started working on the Coliseum Framework architecture.

Coliseum was born. Coliseum is responsible for the spawning of sandboxes at OS/filesystem, web server and database level. It’s a number of libraries that take care of the isolation of every vulnerable web app that runs on the platform.

There’s no virtual machines involved. Coliseum takes care of taking a web application source code, instanciating a sanbox and run it under a new subdomain on coliseumlab.net. In few seconds. Not minutes or hours.

This means that what you do against an instance will not affect other instances.

On top of this framework we had created our most advanced web application security labs (Coliseum Lab WAS 360) that trained thousands students worldwide.

Squaring the circle was to use the Coliseum core to allow EVERYBODY to create a vulnerable app and share it with others.

This was Hack.me.

First thought of as the “Community edition” of the coliseum, changed name when me and the Hack.me developer Giuseppe Trotta (@giutro) stumbled upon the domain name for sale “hack.me”. It’s love at first sight.

We acquired the domain name and decided to just call the project after its domain name: HACK.ME.
What better name in the end?

Project had to be social, open to anybody and meant to be the place where web application security researchers, instructors and students can hit to play web application security in practice.

I think we managed to do it. On October 9th you will appreciate the results of our hard (1 year) work.

In the meantime you can follow the project on Twitter @hackmeproject and subscribe to our RSS where I will disclose more details about the project soon.

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